Matthew Thornton

Press Service International

Matthew Thornton is studying at the University of Auckland, Matthew finds that writing is one of the prime ways he connects with and grows closer to God. He loves seeing the way in which God has wired everyone uniquely and finds immense fulfilment in seeing others discover who God is to them. He would love to hear from you: matthewcthornton13@gmail.com

  • The lighted path

    I think the topic of ‘calling’ has caused many Christians grief over the years. Regardless of where you are in life, it’s likely you’ve thought about your personal calling and purpose at some stage.

  • Grace before critique

    It’s interesting to see how views and approaches to morality have evolved through the ages.

  • The Matthew Thornton Story

    Hi, my name is Matthew. I am 21 years old and live in Auckland, New Zealand.

  • Presence over productivity

    I don’t know about you, but the world just seems busy. I find when I ask people the question, “how are you doing?”, 90% of the time the answer is: “busy”.

  • Seeking real communion

    A few weeks ago, I went on a weekend trip to a small NZ town called ‘Mangakino’ located on the North Island.

  • Choosing Kingdom love

    It goes without saying that globalisation and social media have changed the world as we known it.

  • The necessity of seasons

    During this lockdown period, I’ve been watching the Netflix documentary series, Our Planet, narrated by David Attenborough. An incredible series that has moved me towards praise for the amazing planet we get to enjoy.

  • Hope-shattering hope

    I think that I can safely say that 2020 has not been the year that many of us expected it to be. The world has been confronted with something no one could have ever foreseen.

  • Change: it’s uncomfortable

    After transitioning from high school to university in 2018, 2019 was a year of familiarity and steadiness.

  • Discovering joy

    At high school I remember studying The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway. Written post-WWI, it reveals the fragmentation and devastation caused by the Great War. In particular, it reflects the ‘disillusionment’ felt by many during that time, a worldview known as modernity.